Friday, March 5, 2010

Blooming Friday - Something Borrowed, Something Blue

The Tabebuia trees planted all over my suburb, have come into profuse bloom, adding a bright spot of colour to the roadside. The Tabebuia is a symbol of Brazil. It is insect repellant . The flowers attract bees.
Although the coral pink flowers of the Cassia javanica pale in comparison to the bright Tabebuia blossoms, I like these bee attracting blossoms for their delicate colour. As its name suggests, this tree is a native of Java.

The Agave is not a roadside tree, but the agaves planted beside a path in my school ate in full bloom. The agave is a native of America.
All the above are the borrowed plants from different parts of the world.


I saw this native tree full of blue- purple blooms in Alamatti, near Bijapur last week. Although it looks like the Jacaranda, it is not .



Another native Indian tree is the Copperpod, which is also covered with golden flowers now. This tree attracts not only bees, but hundreds of birds too. Since it is planted right ouside my gate, the entrance to my home is covered by a golden carpet of fallen flowers.
For more Blooming Friday pictures, please visit Katarina at Roses and Stuff.




23 comments:

  1. Its quite rare for trees to sprout beautiful purple flowers. Local trees known as Bongor do have clusters of faint purple flowers. ~bangchik

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  2. Very nice, thanks for sharing!

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  3. I love tabebuias! Mine actually survived several nights in the low 20's! By the way, I think the agave is actually yucca... the flowers make excellent garnishes.

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  4. It's Continental Drift in reverse gear, all the lovely flower-bearing trees coming back to your backyard from wherever they had 'plate-tectonic'ated to! They seem to be competing hard with the natives!

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  5. Wonderful and beautiful! Thank you for showing. Have a nice weekend!

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  6. Bangchik:Yes it is a rare tropical tree that can sprout blue or purple flowers.
    Aerelonian, thanks for your visit and comment.
    Hi Rainforest Gardener! Yes, it is a Yucca. Since I was in a hurry, I only wrote its family name.I didn't know that the flowers were edible! Thanks.
    Shailaja, Yes, a "Return of the Native", so to say.
    Lillebeth, thanks and have a great weekend!

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  7. We know the tabebuias as poui trees. They are beautiful the yellow and the pink. Your pink cassia has a head start on mine. Beautiful photos of trees Lotusleaf. Have a great weekend.

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  8. They are all so beautiful, Lotus, thanks for showing us. I thought for sure that was Jacaranda, we had one at our California house that looked so similar, and was very fragrant. I would like to ask you about the spring festival where people sit and throw paint? My friend sent me a photo of that, it looked like it was raining color. Do you know about that? Have you ever participated? I would love to hear about it. :-)
    Frances

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  9. That does look like a Jacaranda. I'd never heard of one, until I met a co-worker that came from California and she told me about them. Said the blooms were beautiful, but made such a mess in the streets and yards when the bloom time was over lol. I love flowering trees...I have a hard time buying a tree that doesn't flower at some point :)

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  10. Really pretty! I like the variety.

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  11. Lovely shots of exotic plants - thanks for sharing.

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  12. These blooming trees are amazing!

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  13. Oh, how I love the tabebuias!!! These are not native to Florida, but they bloom all over my town in February and March. How glad I am that people have chosen to plant it here.

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  14. Lovely. While we suffer the summer heat, it is amazing how the trees in our part of the world are at their showy best. Trees adapt, humans don't!

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  15. Lovely photoes! Thanks for sharing.
    Birgitta

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  16. aloha,

    i love blooming trees especially that tabebuia and all the others are spectacular...i'll have to start thinking about blooming trees in my area also :)

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  17. Helen, there was a pink Tabebuia in my street which fell down during a storm.
    Frances, the festival of colours,Holi , was last weekend. people throw coloured powder and coloured water on each other during the time. It is to celebrate spring, when all the world wakes up to colour and joy. Yes, I play it every year, but this time I had gone on a trip to some historical places.
    Thank you, Randi and Sweetbay.
    Floridagirl, you seem to have many plants that we have here.
    Radha, yes, very true.
    Gladjekallan, welcome to my blog and thanks for your comment.
    Noel, aloha. You must be having spectacular blooming trees in your part of the world:)

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  18. Your neighbourhood must look breathtaking now with all those trees in bloom! I have the Cassia javanica in my garden but it doesnt come into bloom till much later.
    BTW, I'm curious, do you see hornets drilling into these cassias in your area too? This happens every year in Oct - Nov. in my garden. I don't mind so much because the sap which flows out is the strongest butterfly magnet I've ever seen!

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  19. The tabebuia are blooming on our street too- and the sight of the brilliant yellow against the blue sky is breathtakingly beautiful.

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  20. A lovely selection of beautiful flowers. They have cheered me up today!

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  21. Oh Thank you Lotus Leaf! What beautiful flowering trees! I am drooling over their profuse blooms! Wonderful colors! It is great to have trees from other countries growing nearby and in our gardens! I love native too of course but having a worldly collection is a treat too!

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  22. Luckily there are'borrowed' trees and plants all over the world, although the lovely trees you show today would never like it here, I'm sorry to say.

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  23. These are all unknown tree blossoms for me. They are such a beautiful selection of blooms.

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